Off Air Next: Hearing entitled “The Federal Government’s Role in the Insurance Industry”

Chairman Hensarling Delivers Opening Statement at Hearing on HUD

WASHINGTON – Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) delivered the following opening statement at today’s hearing with Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson: Today we welcome the 17th Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Dr. Ben Carson for his first appearance before our committee. In at least one respect, he may be among the most qualified individual to ever serve as HUD secretary. Why? Secretary Carson was raised by a single mother who...

Committee Advances 22 Bills Forward for House Consideration

WASHINGTON – The Financial Services Committee on Thursday approved 22 bills, largely bipartisan and largely aimed at helping smaller banks, credit unions, and emerging growth companies. Chairman Hensarling (R-TX) told committee members the bills will promote access to capital, reduce the regulatory burden “that slows our economy and makes it harder for people on Main Street to get ahead,” and provide community financial institutions “with desperately needed regulatory relief as we know we are st...

Chairman Says Measures ‘Help Build a Healthier, More Robust Economy’

WASHINGTON – Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) delivered the following open statement as the committee began considering 23 bills on Wednesday: Our committee has been very active and productive since the start of the 115th Congress and today we continue that trend as we consider 23 bills as part of this, our fifth markup of the year. Since this Congress began in January, our committee has reported 18 measures and already nine of them have passed the House, and three co...

WSJ: President Cordray Strikes Again

By The Editorial Board Wall Street Journal President Trump hasn’t fired Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) director Richard Cordray despite ample cause. Yet the economic costs continue to compound—now with the bureau’s payday-loan rule that seeks to put the industry out of business. The CFPB on Thursday finalized its rule regulating the pay-day market. These short-term loans are typically for less than $500 and carry fees of $15 per $100 borrowed. Many low-income Americans use them to ...