Off Air Stay Tuned!

Hensarling: Taxpayers Deserve Far Better

Financial Services Committee Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) released the following statement after the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued a report on the potential management and performance challenges of 2019: “As was demonstrated at the Committee’s hearing on September 27 with FHFA Director Mel Watt and FHFA’s Inspector General, this country’s government-run housing finance system is broken. The FHFA has failed as both the conservator and the regulator of the...

Chairman Hensarling Statement on De-Designation of Prudential

Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) released the following statement after the Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) de-designated Prudential Financial Inc. as a Systemically Important Financial Institution (SIFI): “I’m pleased to see FSOC finally acknowledge that there needs to be an off-ramp from Dodd-Frank Act’s permanent and cumbersome control over those financial institutions that were not to blame for the financial crisis ten years ago. Time and again, as we ...

Financial Markets in the Digital Era

The Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit met today to examine new opportunities for technological innovation to develop new products and services consumers across the financial lobe need. “The pace of technological development in financial services has increased exponentially and dramatically, offering both benefits and potential challenges to the U.S. economy and consumers,” said Subcommittee Chairman Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO). “We can’t address innovation and growth witho...

Chairman Hensarling Delivers Opening Statement at FHFA Oversight Hearing

Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) delivered the following opening statement at today’s full committee hearing to examine the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s (FHFA) role as conservator and regulator of the Government Sponsored Enterprises. Ten years ago, at the time of the financial crisis, Fannie and Freddie were thinly capitalized, they bought loans for as little as 3% down, they issued mortgage-backed securities encompassing roughly half of all first lean mortgages, ...